Full-Length Talks

Speakers will give approximately 50-minute-long presentations on the first day of the conference.

Mark Linimon

Mark Linimon

The FreeBSD Ports Collection: 2012

Slides

In 2012, the FreeBSD Ports Collection has undergone some rapid changes. While at some times disruptive, these have been necessary to move FreeBSD forward to both a larger userbase, and a greatly increased number of ports. Some of the big changes since the end of 2011 have been:

  • introducing pkgng, the next-generation package management system;
  • introducing a new options framework
  • laying the groundwork for changing the default C compiler in FreeBSD 10.0; and
  • adding package builds for new architectures including arm and mips.
This talk will summarize the progress so far this year, and cover the next challenges we will face as the Ports Collection continues to grow.

 

Bio: Mark Linimon is a computer consultant who holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree from Rice University in Houston, Texas. He has been using various Unix-based systems at home since 1987. Within FreeBSD he holds two positions -- one on the Ports Management team (portmgr) and one on the Problem Report Database administration team (bugmeister). In addition he has written the Ports Monitoring System to correlate data from the package building cluster, the Problem Report Database, the source control repository checkins, and other sources.

David Maxwell

David Maxwell

A Trip into the Collective Unconscious of BSD Developers
Slides

In UnConference style, David will present / lead a group exploration of the underlying attitudes that differentiate the BSDs from other operating systems. What are the preferences that lead a person or organization to use BSD rather than one of the alternatives? How do those attitudes shape the behaviors and beliefs that lead each BSD to be what it is instead of something else?

Bio: David Maxwell works as a Senior Systems Architect at Managed Security Provider eSentire. Maxwell has over 25 years of experience as an open source user and developer, and he is particularly active in the NetBSD community. He currently sits on the advisory board for the BSD Certification Group and the program committee for the annual BSDCan conference. He was also a NetBSD Security Officer from 2001-2005, on the NetBSD Foundation Board of Directors 2009-2011 and a contributor to the best-selling O'Reilly title "BSD Hacks." Maxwell has previously worked as Open Source Strategist at Coverity, as a lead kernel developer for Nokia and held network security positions at firms such as Coventus and Synectic Software.

Scott Long

Scott Long

Netflix, FreeBSD, and the world's largest content delivery network

Slides

Over a billion hours of Netflix streaming content are watched world-wide every month. This streaming represents 30% of North America's prime-time internet traffic, and rapid expansion is happening in Europe and Latin America. To efficiently and cost-effectively move this massive amount of data, Netflix developed the OpenConnect Appliance, a FreeBSD-based media streaming and caching device that forms the building block of our own content delivery network. This talk will discuss the OpenConnect Appliance hardware and software, the scalability goals, successes, and challenges that we face, and FreeBSD's central role in our future of content streaming.

Bio: Scott has been hacking on BSD since he discovered 386BSD in 1992. In 2000 he became a project committer in FreeBSD, and from 2002-2006 he was the project's Release Engineer. After 5 interesting years at Yahoo!, Scott joined Netflix in May 2012. In 2011 he received a Bachelor's degree in Aviation Science, and shortly afterwards did a brief stint as a commercial airline pilot. Now back in the real world of computer engineering, he enjoys working on device drivers and system scalability, advocating FreeBSD, and building mad-scientist high voltage electronics with his family in Colorado.

Josh Paetzel

Josh Paetzel

FreeNAS™: Storage for Open Source

FreeNAS is an easy to use storage OS based off of FreeBSD, featuring the ZFS filesystem. It attempts to make managing the powerful features of ZFS easy though a GUI interface, as well as managing block and file based protocols and the networking and config of the underlying FreeBSD OS. Josh will touch on the features of FreeNAS, some storage concepts, such as block versus file protocols, networking technologies and how they relate to storage such as LACP and MPIO, an overview of the ZFS filesystem and what benefits a COW filesystem gives you, and a look at some of the underlying technologies used to build FreeNAS such as nanobsd, django, and python.

Bio: Josh Paetzel is a sysadmin and programmer concentrating on the BSD UNIX environment. A long time contributor and proponent of the FreeBSD project he is also involved with the FreeNAS project, an open source storage appliance based on FreeBSD, as well as the PC-BSD project, an easy to use desktop based on FreeBSD.

Michael Dexter

Michael Dexter

The BHyVe Hypervisor In Depth

Slides

BHyVe, the BSD HyperVisor is an exciting new Popek and Goldberg Type 2 hypervisor for FreeBSD that first appeared in 2010 and is undergoing rapid development. This talk will describe how BHyVe works, giving an updated report on:

  • BHyVe's status in FreeBSD 8, 9 and 10
  • The results of the Google Summer of Code project to bring BIOS emulation to BHyVe for foreign OS support
  • The potential for BHyVe to be used with FreeBSD appliances such as FreeNAS and pfSense

Bio: Michael has used BSD Unix systems since 1991 and wrote his first FreeBSD jail management system in 2005. He has sponsored the BSD.lv sysjail and mult multiplicity research projects and took his BSD support public with the formation of BSD Fund in 2007. Michael is now the CTO of the BSD vendor Gainframe and Editor of the BSD technical journal Call For Testing.

Adrian Chadd

Adrian Chadd

FreeBSD Embedded - Why isn't it everywhere?

FreeBSD runs on many more platforms besides i386 (and amd64.) FreeBSD has supported a wide variety of platforms for quite some time, yet it's still commonly held that FreeBSD is a "PC operating system." The talk will cover a (brief) history of FreeBSD in the embedded MIPS, ARM and PPC space along with where it currently does and doesn't run (or run well.) It will then look at some current examples - Atheros MIPS and wifi support, Raspberry Pi, Dreamplug, Pandaboard, as well as some of the multi-core MIPS hardware being used in shipping products. What doesn't work will also be covered - performance issues, code size and compiler toolchain issues, cross-compiling ports, as well as a general lack of documentation and advocacy.

Bio: Adrian has been tinkering in open source since high school. He now works at Qualcomm Atheros on their internal driver infrastructure. In his spare time, Adrian is working on 802.11n support, maintains the Atheros wifi driver in FreeBSD as well as co-maintains the FreeBSD net80211 stack. Adrian lives in San Jose with no wife, no children, no pets and a rather large collection of embedded devices (most of which run FreeBSD.)

Sean Bruno

Sean Bruno

QEMU on FreeBSD for fun and profit

Slides

QEMU is the surprising core of many virtualization systems on many platforms. Understanding how it works and how to use it for your own purposes can be a useful skill to keep in your toolbox.

  • QEMU installation and invocation on FreeBSD/PC-BSD.
  • Building and rolling your own FreeBSD bootable Disk Images
  • How to debug and play in your own sandboxes.

 

Bio: Sean is a journeyman programmer specializing in keeping custom distributions of FreeBSD for various enterprises. Currently, he is the lead Distro maintainer for Yahoo!'s incarnation of FreeBSD and spends most of his working hours banging his head against merge conflicts, driver failures and the odd behaviour of systems at scale. Functioning as a member of the FreeBSD src committer universe and FreeBSD cluster administration team, Sean attempts to keep good relations with his contacts to maintain a stable hardware platform from various vendors.

Kris Moore

Kris Moore

The Warden® - FreeBSD and Linux Jail Management
Slides

FreeBSD's built-in jail support, provides a secure and efficient way to run “virtual” environments, however to the newcomer, its interface may be difficult and cumbersome to master. Starting in PC-BSD® 9.1, and TrueOS® 9.1, the “Warden” utility has been given a makeover, and enhanced with new features to make jail management both effortless and flexible. During this talk we will explore jail creation and administration topics, including package management, ZFS support and installing Linux distributions into a jail. Both the graphical user interface, and command-line interfaces will be discussed, allowing users the freedom to use whichever tool best fits their needs.

Bio: Kris Moore is the founder and lead developer of the most popular BSD based desktop, PC-BSD. He has authored several unique tools for the desktop, including the PBI package management format, and the Warden, a BSD Jails management utility. He resides in the Knoxville area of East Tennessee with his wife and 4 children.